Throttle Body Service Cost

The engine of the car needs a perfect mixture of air and gas to run smoothly. The throttle body is part of the intake system, which determines how much airflow should be let in for better fuel efficiency and stability. If it’s dirty or clogged up, this may cause poor performance as well as an unstable engine due to lack of proper flow from the throttle body into your vehicle’s cylinders – one byproduct being decreased mileage per gallon (MPG).

How much does a throttle body service cost?

The price of throttle body service will depend on the mechanic performing the job, the geographical location, and the make and model of the vehicle. On average, according to our research, the price of this service can range anywhere from $50 to as much as $200.

You might also like our articles about the cost of replacement of car parts like the thermostat, the engine camshaft, or the clock spring.

Throttle body service details

The mechanic will first scan the computer system for any codes to see if anything else is wrong with your car, aside from just needing a throttle body. This service can be scheduled as part of routine maintenance or performed when there’s an issue that you may have noticed and needs to be diagnosed.

When the engine computer detects that it is running too rich, fuel consumption reduces, or start-up stalls are experienced, a technician will inspect the throttle body wiring to make sure everything is operating smoothly. If there appears to be any carbon build-up around the intake inlet or connections need cleaning then they’ll use brake cleaner. Afterward, new gaskets and throttle assembly will be installed.

Once the service is completed, a technician will take it for one last test drive to make sure everything is in working order, and then they will clear any engine codes pointing towards the fixed problem. This process typically takes around 30-60 minutes. You should receive a service warranty, to ensure that everything runs smoothly and no problems pop up in the short future after the service.

Any extra costs to consider?

In order to save time, the mechanic will often recommend buying a new throttle body instead of fixing one that’s broken. But this decision can be costly. You’ll either pay around $200 – $1,800 for just the part alone or you may spend even more depending on the make and model of your car, as well as where you live.

Tips to remember

Dirty Throttle BodyThe check engine light is often the first sign of a failing throttle body. Other symptoms include a lack of power, poor transmission functioning, or poor car performance in general.

Your car is a complicated machine that requires regular maintenance. If you neglect it, the cost of repairs can be expensive and frustrating in the future. A simple service like checking your throttle body every 30k miles will keep things running smoothly for long periods of time.

If a mechanic mentions that your throttle body needs to be cleaned, you should ask for clarification on why this is necessary and how they determined it was dirty. The best mechanics will remove the air intake hose in order to perform their inspection or use an idle scanner at base idle. At least this is what CertifiedMasterTech tells us about the talk you might have with an unreliable mechanic.

Is there any way to save some money?

Doing your own car maintenance saves you money and time. For instance, when it comes to cleaning the throttle body of a vehicle, one needs only to purchase an inexpensive throttle cleaner for less than $10 at their local auto supply store and then follow detailed directions they’ll find on the bottle on how best to clean this part with ease.

Preventative maintenance is important to make sure you’re car stays in top condition. It makes sense, then that most professional shops offer a flat rate for preventative services over the phone and on their website. You can also look online for coupons or discounts. For example, at the time of this writing, we found a $119 coupon from Honda dealerships across Washington state.

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