Winged Foot Golf Club Membership Cost

The Winged Foot Golf Club, situated in Mamaroneck, New York City, has actually been ranked as one of the leading golf courses in the U.S. and worldwide by Golf Magazine.

In 1921, a group of members from the New York Athletic Club, who wanted to play golf, thought of the idea of making their own golf course. When the athletic club was not responsive to their idea, the group ultimately left the athletic club and carried on with their plan to make a course. They purchased 280 acres of land property in Mamaroneck and worked with the well-known golf designer A.W. Tillinghast for the ‘man-sized golf course’ they had in mind.

Just how much does a Winged Foot Golf Club membership cost?

Some online sources, although not verified as of now, state that the initiation costs can be as high as $200,000, and yearly fees are within the $15,000 to $20,000 price range ($1,250+ a month). The expenses of registering with the Winged Foot Golf Club, just like any other country club, will significantly depend upon the kind of membership you are going for. The Winged Foot Golf Club, nevertheless, is a private club and membership is possible only by invite.

You might also like our articles about the cost of memberships with clubs like Secession, Coto de Caza, or Exmoor.

The New York Post noted that the initiation costs can be anywhere from $35,000 to $150,000 and the waiting list is as long as ten years.

Winged Foot Golf Club details

The Winged Foot opened for play in 1923 with 2 18-hole championship-level courses: the East and the West course. Both courses are considered great creative works of Tillinghast and seen as 2 of the very best designs in golf’s golden era of architecture.

Members have complete access to the 2 golf courses, the clubhouse, the Grille, locker rooms, services, and other advantages of the club.

What are the additional expenses?

The expenses above will not include the food and drink minimums, which, at this time are pretty much unknown.

Green and guest costs will apply to members who do not have golf privileges.

Private lessons, health centers, competitions, and getaways are all extra expenses to take into account.

Social gatherings, often held throughout the year, can be an extra expense to consider as well.

Tips to keep in mind

Winged Foot Golf ClubBoth golf courses have actually hosted numerous significant competitions such as the U.S. Women’s Open and U.S. Senior Open.

Winged Foot is also called a “player’s club” due to the fact that a lot of the club’s expert trainers ended up being professional players and a couple of them even became champions in golf competitions. The winner of the 1941 Masters and United States Open was Craig Harmon; he was the club’s golf pro from 1939 to 1945. Another club pro, Claude Harmon, was the winner of the Masters in 1948. Furthermore, previous club pro assistants, Jackie Burke Jr., won the 1956 Masters, and Dave Marr was a 1965 PGA champion. A number of the club pros carried on to win significant events later on in their careers.

Aside from the club’s highly respected guest list, Winged Foot has a remarkably dignified clubhouse made from brick, stone, and slate. The stones were picked from the tons of rocks blasted throughout the construction of both courses. Discussions circulated that the Duke of Windsor, who was a routine guest at the club, frequently felt homesick as the clubhouse reminded him of his English house and the palace. The club’s front entryway is protected by Leo the Lion, a sculpted sentry that stands under the front patio. The hallmark color of blue-and-white.

The club does not have a tee time and prefers it this way given that members think that playing should not be bounded by the clock.

The club complies with a rigorous dress code, speed of play, and cell phone protocols. For more details and the guidelines and policies, you can check the club’s main page.

GolfDigest notes that the club has among the highest percentages of single-digit handicappers among all clubs in the United States.

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